• Project commenced:

    Traditional use of plants for medicinal purposes is a feature of indigenous human societies. The biological principles that underpin many such traditional remedies has been established using various scientific methodologies. 

  • Project commenced:

    This research project aims to determine how whānau might flourish. The researchers, led by Professor Mason Durie, focuses on six themes – the characteristics of flourishing whānau; profiling the contemporary lives of Māori whānau; exploring the cultural realities of modern whānau; identifying the necessary resources (cultural, social, economic) for whānau to flourish ; assessing the challenges facing whānau in 2025, and developing strategies that will enable whānau to flourish.

  • Internship project

    Project commenced:

    In 2012, a wave of youth suicides in Northland featured far too many of Ngātiwai descent. 19 people under 25 years took their own lives, a huge increase from 5 the year before (Penney & Dobbs, 2014). Suicide rates for Māori youth in Te Tai Tokerau, including the Ngātiwai rohe, is therefore a major public health issue.

  • Project commenced:

    This research project evaluated and monitored the environmental, social, economic and cultural impacts of the grounding of the ship Rena on Otaiti, with a particular focus on the impacted areas of Maketū, Mōtītī, and Pāpāmoa. The research team led by Dr Kepa Morgan incorporated an assessment of the mauri of the impacted people within these areas and their environs. Mauri is a universal concept in Māori thinking and is the force between the physical and spiritual attributes of something.

  • Internship project

    Project commenced:

    Author: Manaia Rehu. Supervisor: Dr Kepa Morgan Hydraulic fracturing or ‘fracking’ is emerging as the future of global energy. Fracking operations are increasing at an alarming rate throughout North America and the rest of the world. However, the process of fracturing fuel-rich subterranean rock deep below the surface to extract oil and gas has great uncertainty surrounding it. The aim of this study is to use the Mauri Model Decision Making Framework to investigate the impacts of fracking on an indigenous reservation in Alberta, Canada.

  • Internship project Scoping project

    Project commenced:

    Author: Elizabeth Jurisich Strickett. Supervisors: Associate Professor Helen Moewaka Barnes and Dr Tim McCreanor. This report was written while undertaking a Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga internship with Whāriki, SHORE and Whāriki Research Centre, Massey University. The review topic of marginalising Māori parents arose out of a report on rangatahi and sexual coercion, which included an examination of gender roles, Māori concepts around sexuality and parenting (Moewaka Barnes, 2010).

  • Project commenced:

    This research looked at how the 2010/11 earthquakes in Ōtautahi (Christchurch) have affected Māori mental health communities. The research team led by Dr Simon Lambert focused on how the support networks for Tangata Whaiora (a term applied to Māori mental health clients that translates as people seeking health) and their whānau responded and recovered through the disaster.
     

  • Internship project

    Project commenced:

    Author: Joshua Tahana. Supervisor Dr Elaine Ballard This report outlines the background for a study to be undertaken tracking phonological development (speech skills) in Māori for Māori speaking pre-school children. Although there is a substantial body of literature on how children develop speech sounds in English we know nothing about the developmental trajectory in Māori.

  • Internship project

    Project commenced:

    Author: Tara Dalley. Supervisor: Dr Te Taka Keegan The aim of this research was to determine the level of awareness and willingness to use software with a te reo Māori interface by the Māori medium education sector. The literature describes the importance and function of language in culture, society and as a part of identity; te reo Māori is an important part of Māori culture and reflects the values and principles of the Māori worldview.

  • Full project Pae Tawhiti project

    Project commenced:

    He Mangōpare Amohia: Strategies for Māori Economic Development

    Critical success factors for Māori economic development have been identified in a just released report on the three-year Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) research programme – Te Tupunga Māori Economic Development.

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